Vista Online by Friends Of Vista, Inc. - A Texas Nonprofit Corporation | Informative Articles For Your Life | Click Here To Return To Index Page Of Site

Five Presentation Techniques Not To Use As A Speaker

   By: Chris King

I hope you will learn some good presentation techniques by my pointing out what NOT to do when presenting. Remember the following are techniques to AVOID.

Be late for your presentation, or rush in at the last minute, just in time. This will convince the meeting planner and the audience members of how busy a person you are. You didn't even have time to call them to let them know you were on the way. It will just make your arrival more dramatic and will also let them know how little you care about them or the impression you are making (or not making).

Don't worry about your appearance. After all, they hired you for your expertise, not because of the way you look. You were in too much of a hurry to make sure that your clothes were pressed and your shoes were shined. Anyway, you are a creative person who doesn't worry about looking sharp. Besides, the audience is dressed in casual attire, so why shouldn't you? Even though we hate to believe it, their first impression of your sloppiness will remain as a lasting impression of you as a non-professional.

Start your presentation with a joke that has nothing to do with your topic. Isn't this the time-tested formula that speakers have been using for years? How about an off-color joke, at that? That will really cement you as a far-from-professional presenter in their estimation. Or, if you don't have a joke, you can always start with the lame opening, “It's so nice to be here with you today.” That will knock them off their seats and get them to sit up and pay attention.

Become known for your large array of mannerisms and/or distracting habits. You can work to add many of these to your repertoire. Some habits to try are: filler words such as “um,” “er,” “you know,” pacing back and forth, swinging your arms, putting your hands in your pockets (jingling change will enhance this habit), picking at your clothes, wringing your hands, smoothing your hair, swaying from side to side, glancing at your watch continually, leaning on the lectern, putting your hand in front of your mouth, and laughing so hard at your own jokes you can't continue. All of these are guaranteed to keep your audience from remembering anything you told them.

Do not pay attention to your voice and/or speed of speaking. After all, if you have meaningful information, it doesn't matter, does it, if you speak in a monotone, or speed along so that you can fit it all into your limited time frame. Both of these techniques are guaranteed to cause your audience to “turn off” and take a needed rest. They may even thank you for the break.

Banish all of the techniques that I have highlighted, and you will give presentations that listeners learn from and enjoy. And, you will be asked back!

Chris King is a professional speaker, storyteller, writer, website creator / designer, free agent, and fitness instructor. Sign up for her eclectic E-newsletter, Portfolio Potpourri, at http://www.PowerfulPresentations.net You will find her information-packed E-book How to Leave Your Audiences Begging for MORE! at http://www.OutrageouslyPowerfulPresenter.com and her business website at http://www.CreativeKeys.biz


Article Source: http://www.friendsofvista.org/articles/article74239.html





Related Articles

Advice About The Most Informative Help With Reference To Dat - Tom
10 Reasons Why People Attend Book Signings - Catherine Franz
To Edit Or Revise - Harriet Silkwood
The Artistry Of Change: How To Turn Fear & Doubt Into Brilliance As A Public Speaker - Carla Rieger
Public Speaking: Give Me A Brake - Tom Antion
Screenwriter Workshop, Course: Midnight Cowboy (1969) Deconstructed - Kal Bishop
Building Character - Kevin Hart
Pausest - Tom Antion
Screenwriting: Time Pressure Versus Incubation - Kal Bishop
Are You In Search Of The Best Sourced Advice Regarding Learn - Tom
   

 
Website Design and Logo Design by InfoServe Media, LLC

Copyright © 2017 Friends of Vista, Inc. TM - A Texas Nonprofit Corporation
Privacy Statement | Contact Us